Taguada

Andrés Montero, one of the most renowned storytellers of his generation, weaves together a fascinating legend about the class struggle and portrays a deep Chile eager for music and orality. A work that praises the ability of stories to travel through time and be told in multiple and unsuspected ways.
Summary

A literary work that celebrates the ability of stories to travel through time and to be told in multiple and unexpected ways.

At the beginning of the 19th century, in central Chile, a dazzling duel between the landowner Javier de la Rosa and a labourer of slave descent known as the "mulato Taguada" took place. Two centuries later, a young man hears this story from the mouth of Nicanor Parra (Cervantes Prize, 2011) himself and, amazed, decides to investigate the scenarios and implications of this famous counterpoint.

Taguada is a choral novel narrated by various characters: researchers, payadores (improvising folk trovadors), priests, fairground workers, soldiers, journalists, gravediggers and poets, who instead of solving the mystery behind the story, end up with more questions. Is it true that they competed for ninety-six hours? Is it true that the landowner was crowned and that Taguada on the other hand faced a disastrous future?

“Stories travel. Perhaps there is nothing in the world that travels like stories, or at least like good stories. They wander for years, centuries and even millennia going from voice to voice, from earth to earth, from fire to fire, crossing oceans, deserts and mountains, settling down and huddling in the voice of those who will now make them their own. Thus, it seems that they win over oblivion, time and death. Until one day nobody tells them again. Until one day they perish”.

Category
Narrative
Fiction
Text
Andrés Montero
Publisher
Sudamericana
Year
2019
Language
Spanish
ISBN
9789562625876
Pages
196pp
Cover
Softcover
Size
15X23cm