Women behind Pinochet’s Prison Bars

The dramatic testimony of three women who suffered state terrorism.
Summary

“From that afternoon in December 2013, I started to know them, to listen and to follow with difficulty the threads that would lead me to those women fighters they were once.”

The coup d'état of September 11, 1973 was certainly the most important and defining event of the 20th century in Chile. For those who were its victims, it was an institutional rupture that blew the country's public history to pieces, also fracturing the symbolic-cultural system that had given meaning to Chilean society and attempting to erase from the collective memory the constitutional processes and previous democratic institutions, leaving a trail of dead, detained-disappeared, exiles, etc. Today, after seventeen years of dictatorship and twenty-five years of democracy, the legacy of the military coup undoubtedly still permeates the lives of all the generations that now inhabit the country, and Chilean society continues to be fractured by a diversity of conflicting and antagonistic memories that express the moral and political conflict of a community that has not been able to reconcile itself. 

Four voices meet: three ex political prisoners and a journalist who tells their story. Three women that fought against Pinochet's dictatorship and went to jail labeled as “terrorists”. They met in prison as political prisoners and at the beginning of the 90’s recovered their freedom. But they will encounter a totally different country: the democracy has arrived but they are still seen as “terrorists”. 

Category
Narrative
Non-fiction
Text
Vivian Lavín
Publisher
Ediciones Radio Universidad de Chile
Year
2015
Language
Spanish
ISBN
9563587189
Pages
230pp